Our Services

At Pleasant View Gardens we design all spaces. From small areas of a yard to entire properties, and from residential to commercial sites. We can create an area to best fit your style, needs, and budget.
Once a design has been created, and approved the installation can commence. By removing some or all of the existing landscaping and enhancing soils we are able to transform dull, lifeless areas.
Keeping your space clean and organized helps keep the lasting effect of the initial design, as well as assists with plant health. We work with designs we have custom created, as well as designs from other groups.
At Pleasant View Gardens we provide organic practices and offer sustainable gardening techniques. We use a variety of organic products that ensure safety while maintaining the heath of your gardens.
What better way to accent your home or office than with flowers and foliage. Beautiful color, unique containers and tasteful displays that fit a space are essential in great garden design and can add character to any property.

Our Recent Posts

Juglone in Landscaping

Juglone in Landscaping

Juglone is the most prevalent biochemical in the Black Walnut. It’s also in Juglans cinerea or Butternut tree as well as Carya ovata, commonly known as Shagbark Hickory. However, these latter two trees have far less juglone in their system compared to the Black Walnut. It is the Black Walnut that carries a negative connotation for gardeners because in the landscape Juglone is the oppressor to many other plants. 

Birch, Maple & Walnut tree Pruning

Birch, Maple & Walnut tree Pruning

As I’m sitting here piecing together the latest tips for pruning deciduous trees, I can look out my window and see a beautiful Betula nigra (River Birch) in my neighbor’s landscape, and right next door on the other side, a massively, giant Acer saccharinum (Silver Maple). I would never have thought there is a common thread between Birches and Maples when it comes to pruning. Yet in spite of their many differences, especially size and look, both need to be pruned in the months of June and July when sap production is relatively lower. Both of these trees “bleed” heavily in late winter when the days are sunny, and warmer (relatively speaking for Minnesota winters), and the nighttime climate is just below freezing. These temperatures trigger a pressure build up in the roots of the Maples, and Birches as well, that pushes the sap up and into the limbs where it will freely flow out of any cut.